Safecast : <<We’re incredibly excited to announce the launch of the Safecast iOS app available in the App Store now. Last year we reached out to Nick Dolezal, creator of the most amazing GeigerBot, with some questions and ideas about his app. It didn’t take long for us to realize he would be a fantastic addition to the Safecast team and he agreed. We started brainstorming on what a Safecast iOS app might look like and what it might offer. The results of those continued discussions are live now. We’re most excited about the “virtual geiger counter” aspect to this app – using the GPS on your iPhone or iPad you can quickly see readings that have been taken around you. We’ve got the full Safecast dataset on board, as well as a handful of other publicly available radiation measurement data sets which gives a comprehensive exposure map for the US and Japan, with other areas being filled in as we collect those readings. There’s also the ability to connect your own geiger counter and take readings which can be submitted back to the Safecast Database.

We feel like this will be an incredibly useful application for just about anyone to have, and hope to keep improving it’s functionality as well grow. Enjoy! >>

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/safecast/id571167450?mt=8

Safecast | Adrian Storey from Focus Forward Films on Vimeo.

 


The 10-member commission is one of several panels investigating the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The report follows a six-month investigation involving more than 900 hours of hearings and interviews with more than 1,100 people. The commission’s chairman, Kiyoshi Kurokawa, a professor emeritus at Tokyo University, said in a scathing introduction that cultural traits had caused the disaster.



TOKYO | Wed Jun 20, 2012 5:54am EDT

(Reuters) – Toshiba Corp said on Wednesday it will begin building solar plants with a total generating capacity of 100 megawatts on the country’s disaster-hit northeastern coastline, making it the biggest solar project in Japan.

Electronics conglomerate Toshiba, which makes everything from lightbulbs to nuclear reactors, said it will spend around 30 billion yen ($379.6 million) to build several large-scale solar plants in Minami Soma more than a year after a devastating earthquake and tsunami hit Japan.

The project overtakes an earlier plan by Kyocera Corp, heavy machinery maker IHI Corp and Mizuho Corporate Bank, which said it will launch a 70-megawatt plant in southern Japan.

Toshiba said it will start building the plants this year and aim to start operations in 2014.

Residents of Minami Soma, located just 25 km (16 miles) from the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, were forced to flee their homes last year after a part of the city was deemed a no-gone zone by the government in the wake of the world’s worst atomic disaster in 25 years.

The company’s announcement comes after the Japanese government approved new incentives for renewable energy through an introduction of feed-in tariffs (FIT) this week, which is expected to unleash billions of dollars in clean-energy investment.

(Reporting by Mari Saito and Risa Maeda; Editing by Jeremy Laurence)