FranceLa fin d’année approchant il est temps pour nous de faire le point sur les réalisations de cette année et les progrès à faire pour 2014.

Dès le premier janvier nous nous sommes attelés à l’amélioration de vitesse de connexion sur notre site internet afin d’offrir un contenu aux internautes dans des délais raisonnables.

Dans le courant du mois de Mars nous avons réalisés notre troisième projet au Japon dans les hébergements « d’urgence » à Minamisoma : le projet FFJPA03. Ceci grâce à la générosité de quelques donateurs à l’international sur notre compagne Indiegogo 2012. Merci à eux !FFJPA03 - Fukushima Future 2013

Tout au long de l’année nous avons continué à effectuer, comme tant d’autres sur le net, notre veille de l’information sur nos thématiques.

En septembre, le site internet de Fukushima-Future, a complètement été rénové afin de répondre aux standards d’aujourd’hui. Les cinquante heures investies à cette tache ont été un déclencheur quant à la nécessité d’être attentif à l’évolution des tendances du Web (même pour une organisation à but non lucratif).

En Novembre, dans le cadre de notre mission de communication, de sensibilisation, et de lutte contre l’oubli, nous avons participé aux Golden Blog Awards 2013 à Paris. Même si aucuns prix ne nous a été décerné, cette étape a été très riche en enseignement vis-à-vis de notre identité en tant qu’organisation, des évolutions à mener, et de notre ligne éditoriale.

Pour 2014 nous espérons pouvoir réaliser un projet d’aide aux populations dans la préfecture de Fukushima, si la générosité est aux rendez-vous. N’hésitez à faire un Don en Yen Japonais via Paypal. Le prochain projet FFJPA04, pourrait être orienté sur le divertissement des réfugiés, ou un petit partenariat pour un projet éducatif (budget et objectif sont deux éléments étroitement liés). Dans la continuité des efforts entrepris, nous débuterons début 2014, une amélioration notoire du site Fukushima-Future, afin d’y inclure de nombreux outils, qui nous l’espérons vous satisferons encore d’avantage et feront de cette ressource Web un élément intuitif et moderne.

A l’approche des trois ans de la catastrophe, nous comptons sur vous, pour commenter, animer et partager nos sites et réseaux sociaux. Tous ensembles, œuvrons pour lutter contre l’oubli. Merci FF

EnglishSince the end of the year is near, it’s time for us to make a statement of what has been achieved in 2013, and what we could do in 2014 to progress.

Starting from the First of January, we did work hardly on the Fukushima-Future Website in order to achieve some substantial progress in terms of Speed.

During March 2013, in Minamisoma Japan, we did realize our third Project FFJPA03 in order to provide some supports to the elderly’s living in emergency shelters. This have been possible with the generosity of a couple of individualsFFJPA02 - Fukushima Future 2012 during our 2012 Indiegogo crowd funding campaign. Many thanks to them!

In September, we did refurbish totally the Fukushima-Future Website in order to be more in response to the demands of the non-stopping Web requirements. The time that we did spent at this task was an ignition to the needs of been as often as possible careful on the way we deliver our content, and the importance of been up to date with the natural evolution of the web.

In November. In link with our communication and informative missions, we did take part at The Golden Blog Awards in Paris. In spite of the fact that we did not win any price for our work, it has been a real experience where we learnt a lot concerning our identity as an Organization, the progress to achieve and the way we publish news.

In 2014, we hope to be able of organizing a project to help the 3.11 refugees in the Fukushima Prefecture, if we receive some donations to fund it. Feel free to donate. The next project, FFJPA04, could be orientated to the divertissement of the refugees, or a small educative partnership (Budget and Goal are obviously linked). In the guide line of the continuous efforts made this year, we will modernize again the Fukushima-Future website, in order to add some tools. We do hope this will satisfy your user experience, and will transform the website into a modern resources library.

Since we are getting closed to the Third year ceremony of the disaster, we count on you to comment, act, and share our social networks. Together, let’s all work against oblivion. Thanks FF



Six Japanese women offer brutally honest views on the state of the clean-up, the cover-ups and untruths since the nuclear accident in Fukushima, and how it has affected their lives, homes and families.

Over a year since three reactors went into meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, a broad, disparate anti-nuclear movement is growing in Japan. Nowhere is that more apparent, perhaps, than in Fukushima prefecture, where a group of local women boldly protest the deafening silence of the Japanese government over the worst nuclear accident of this century. Largely ignored by their own media, these brave women brush aside their cultural shyness and share their brutally honest views on the state of the cleanup, the cover-ups, the untruths and the stagnant political climate in today’s Japan. Supported with rare footage from inside the exclusion zone, as well as from abandoned neighboring towns, the Women of Fukushima (“Fukushima no Onnatachi”) offers startlingly candid insights, in the women’s own voices, about what has become of their lives, homes, and families in the aftermath of 3/11. women-of-fukushima.com

Women of Fukushima-English subtitles from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.

Paul Johannessen, Director / Producer:
Born in Sydney, Australia, Paul has worked in both TV/Film production and music production since 1999. After a brief period in Norway, Paul moved to Tokyo in 2009, and started working freelance as a cameraman and editor. Eight months after the earthquake and tsunami, Paul began a documentary project in Ishinomaki seeking to make something inspiring out of something tragic. The result was a short documentary, Then and Now, which continues to find success in assisting the people of Ishinomaki by bringing awareness to their plight. This success left Paul and his team – Jeffrey and Ivan – with a hunger to do more which led to them collaborating again for the Women of Fukushima.

Women of Fukushima-English subtitles from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.



waveThis HRA is based on preliminary dose estimates and is intended to give an indication of the radiation-related health implications of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. Such information can support the identification of needs and priorities for public health actions. The target audience includes policy makers and health professionals as well as relevant international organizations. It should be noted that this report discusses health risks rather than health effects . It is not intended to provide estimates of the disease burden in the population or to calculate possible excess disease cases due to the radiation exposure resulting from this accident.

Download the Full Report (PDF)

The scope of the HRA includes the general population in Fukushima prefecture, the rest of Japan and around the world, and the Fukushima Daiichi NPP emergency workers, i.e. employees of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and contractors exposed during the emergency phase. It does not include first responders (e.g. police, fire fighters, and Japan self-defence forces) because the information about their radiation doses was not available to the HRA Expert Group within the timeframe of its work. The general population groups are defined by geographic location, age and sex. Four distinct geographical areas are identified based on preliminary estimated doses. The geographical coverage includes the whole world, with greater spatial detail in the estimated risks presented for Japan, and in particular for the Fukushima prefecture. Age groups considered are 1-year-old infants, 10-year-old children and 20-year-old adults.

 

 



Greenpeace Feb 2013The disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 proves again that industry profits and people pay. Almost two years after the release of massive amounts of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear disaster, hundreds of thousands of people are still exposed to the long-term radioactive contamination caused by the accident. The daily lives of victims are disrupted. They have lost their homes, their jobs, their businesses, their farms, their communities, and a way of life they enjoyed.

This new Greenpeace report demonstrates how the nuclear sector evades responsibility for its failures. The nuclear industry is unlike any other industry: it is not required to fully compensate its victims for the effects of its large, long-lasting, and trans-boundary disasters. In this report, the current status of compensation for victims of the Fukushima disaster is analysed as an example of the serious problems due to lack of accountability for nuclear accidents. The report also looks into the role of nuclear suppliers in the failure of the Fukushima reactors.

We learned from Fukushima that nuclear power can never be safe. The nuclear industry, largely protected from the financial liability for the Fukushima accident, continues to do business, while the Fukushima victims still lack proper compensation and support. Would things be different if the next big nuclear disaster happened in your country? You would likely be facing the very same problems. We have to phase out dangerous nuclear power entirely, and do so as soon as possible. Yet, if there is another major nuclear accident, people could be given better protection if we hold the nuclear industry fully accountable and liable. We need to learn the lessons from Fukushima, and change the system in order to make all companies in the nuclear industry responsible for the risks they create. (Source and Text – Greenpeace.com)



Then and Now : During a trip to Ishinomaki in November 2011, and after the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster ; Paul, Ivan and Jeffrey interviewed a number of the Tsunami survivors.Eight months, to the day, after the disaster of March 11, 2011, they visited the reconstruction area in Ishinomaki, interviewed many survivors rebuilding their lives and recorded the condition of the Kadonowaki tsunami area. They captured their tragic memories, sadness, anger, hope, insurmountable frustration, their seemingly unstoppable power, their humanity and their relentless desire to build their future. The Team condensed this day into a 15 minute film and posted it on Vimeo and Youtube. It has been viewed by 350,000 people. As a direct result, over 20,000 US dollars in funds and supplies have been delivered to Tohoku.


Born in Sydney, Australia, Paul Richard Johannessen has worked in both TV/Film production and music production since 1999. After a brief period in Norway, Paul moved to Tokyo in 2009, and started working freelance as a cameraman and editor.

Jeffrey Jousan, Born in Tenafly, New Jersey, is a audiophile recordist/engineer, producer, location coordinator and interviewer. Passionate about high quality sound, on location, on set or in the studio, he knows the power of sound adds emotion and life to video. In addition to great sound and stunning images, the subjects of interviews must feel comfortable and trust their interviewer. Jeffrey, quickly puts his interviewees at ease, with jokes, a story or shared experience, a soft tone of voice and focused, compassionate attention which brings a natural frankness and intimacy to the Interviews. Jeffrey has been working with Kugi Productions. The founders are Paul Johannessen, Jeffrey Jousan and Ivan Kovac – three film-makers who were all living in Japan during the disaster in 2011 (Women of Fukushima is the first production produced by « Kugi Productions »). On top of that He’s working for Studio J and other projects.

Eight months after the earthquake and tsunami, Paul began a documentary project in Ishinomaki seeking to make something inspiring out of something tragic. The result was a short documentary, Then and Now, which continues to find success in assisting the people of Ishinomaki by bringing awareness to their plight. « Then and Now » is the proud winner of Best Documentary and the Grand Prix prize at Super Shorts Film Festival, 2012. The video is also available in the following languages:Portuguese: vimeo.com/41279189 Italian: vimeo.com/40420477. This success left, Paul and his team, – Jeffrey and Ivan – with a hunger to do more which led to them collaborating again for the Women of Fukushima.



 Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown, children in Fukushima are suffering from severe nose bleeds and are developing skin rashes and thyroid cysts and nodules (A2). Citing a lack of transparency in the official medical testing of their children and the ineffectiveness of the decontamination of their homes and schools, the children’s mothers take radiation monitoring into their own hands.

 

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland. At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”. Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian Thomas Ash – Awards :

Nippon Visions Award (best film by new-coming Japan-based director)
at the 2013 Nippon Connection Japanese Film Festival in Frankfurt, Germany, for ‘A2-B-C’ (2013, Japan)

Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary
at the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival for “In the Grey Zone” (2012, Japan).

Filmmaker of the Future Award
at the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival.

Prix de Canton Vaud (best first film)
at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland, for “the ballad of vicki and jake” (2006, UK).



In Containment: the people of Minamisoma, 15 months after the meltdown
「格納容器の中」南相馬市民、メルトダウンから15ヶ月後
Part 5 STORY: After returning from the exclusion zone, the crew goes to a testing site to be measured for radiation exposure. Later, Ian visits a nursery school located just outside of the 30km radiation zone, where the head teacher opens up about her fears for the children’s future. Finally, the children go out to play, but their conversation quickly turns shockingly real.

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland.

At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”.

Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian’s Filmography:

“minus1287”, director/ producer. documentary/ 61 min/ Japan/ est 2014.
As she nears the end of life, Kazuko’s observations on love, money, marriage and her own death change, as does her relationship with the filmmaker.

“A2-B-C”, director. documentary/ 71 min/ Japan/ 2013.
Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, children who were not evacuated are found to have thyroid cysts and nodules.

“In the Grey Zone”, director.  documentary/ 89 min/ Japan/ 2012.
The children of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, living inside the radiation zone head back to school after the nuclear meltdown.

“Jake, not finished yet”, director.  documentary/ 81 min/ Japan & UK/ 2010.
The story of two mothers and two sons whose chance meeting seven years earlier changes their lives forever.

“the ballad of vicki and jake”, director/ producer.  documentary/ 84 min/ UK/ 2006.
A family struggles with drug abuse, homelessness and their relationship with the filmmaker.


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