Six femmes Japonaises nous offrent leurs versions brutes sans états d’âmes sur l’état de la décontamination, les dissimulations, les mensonges, et la façon dont cela à affecté leurs vies, leurs foyers et leurs familles depuis l’accident de Fukushima.

Déjà un an depuis que les trois réacteurs de la centrale nucléaire de Fukushima Daiichi sont entrés en fusion, un vaste et disparate mouvement anti-nucléaire grandit au Japon. Nulle part ailleurs il n’est plus apparent, peut-être, que dans la préfecture de Fukushima, où un groupe de femmes proteste hardiment contre le silence assourdissant du gouvernement Japonais envers le pire accident nucléaire de ce siècle. Largement ignoré par leurs propres médias, ces courageuses femmes écartent leurs timidités culturelles et partagent leurs visions honnêtes et brut de décoffrage sur l’état de la décontamination, les dissimulations, les mensonges, et sur le climat immobiliste politique dans le Japon d’aujourd’hui. Soutenu par de rares images de la zone interdite, ainsi que des villes voisines abandonnées, elles («Fukushima no Onnatachi») offrent des idées étonnamment franches de Femmes, sur ce qu’est devenu leurs vies, foyers, et familles suite aux conséquences de la catastrophe du 11 Mars 2011.

Women of Fukushima – En Français VOSTFR from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.

Paul Johannessen : Directeur / Producteur Né à Sydney en Australie, Paul à travaillé dans le domaine de la production et de la production musicale à la télévision et au cinéma depuis 1999. Après une courte période en Norvège, Paul s’installa à Tokyo en 2009, où il commença à travailler en free-lance comme caméraman et éditeur. Huit mois après le tremblement de terre et le tsunami, Paul commença un projet documentaire à Ishinomaki dans lequel il chercha à faire quelque chose d’inspirant de quelque chose de tragique. La résultante est un court documentaire, <<Then and Now>>, qui continue à ce jour de trouver succès dans l’assistance aux habitants de Ishinomaki, en sensibilisant à leurs situations critiques. Ce succès laissa Paul et son équipe – Jeffrey et Ivan – avec une envie insatiable de faire plus ; les menant à collaborer une fois de plus pour les Femmes de Fukushima.

Women of Fukushima – En Français VOSTFR from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.



Fukushima-Daiihi-NPSGoogle has posted new explorable images from the Japanese coast devastated by an enormous tsunami. The pictures posted on Google’s Street View will allow web users to see how the disaster changed the area. The images include pictures of towns and villages near the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant where radiation levels are still too high for people to return. According to news24, users can explore the region as it looked before the disaster and can even compare it with how it looked in the immediate aftermath and how it looks now, the report said. They show a mixed picture of progress, with some areas in which rebuilding is well under way, and others where nature appears to be reclaiming land on which decaying shells of buildings sit. The Internet giant is offering views of the deserted streets of 12 towns and villages in Fukushima prefecture, including Futaba and Okuma, where the crippled plant sits. They also include other evacuation zones such as Iitate, Katsurao, Kawauchi, Naraha, Hirono, and Minamisoma in Fukushima prefecture. The newly updated street views were taken between April and August this year, a Google spokeswoman in Japan said. The images are part of a project named “Memories for the Future”, which also comprises photos and movies uploaded by the general public. Please feel free to share some of our findings during our « Street view tour » inside the zone.

Fukushima-Daiihi-NPSFukushima Daiichi NPS

Fukushima-Daiichi-backFukushima Daiichi – Back Entrance

BaseCamp-Inside FukushimaBaseCamp – Inside Fukushima

On the way to Fukushima (2)On the way to Fukushima

Greenhouse - Google - Inside FukushimaGreenhouse – Google – Inside Fukushima



Six Japanese women offer brutally honest views on the state of the clean-up, the cover-ups and untruths since the nuclear accident in Fukushima, and how it has affected their lives, homes and families.

Over a year since three reactors went into meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, a broad, disparate anti-nuclear movement is growing in Japan. Nowhere is that more apparent, perhaps, than in Fukushima prefecture, where a group of local women boldly protest the deafening silence of the Japanese government over the worst nuclear accident of this century. Largely ignored by their own media, these brave women brush aside their cultural shyness and share their brutally honest views on the state of the cleanup, the cover-ups, the untruths and the stagnant political climate in today’s Japan. Supported with rare footage from inside the exclusion zone, as well as from abandoned neighboring towns, the Women of Fukushima (“Fukushima no Onnatachi”) offers startlingly candid insights, in the women’s own voices, about what has become of their lives, homes, and families in the aftermath of 3/11. women-of-fukushima.com

Women of Fukushima-English subtitles from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.

Paul Johannessen, Director / Producer:
Born in Sydney, Australia, Paul has worked in both TV/Film production and music production since 1999. After a brief period in Norway, Paul moved to Tokyo in 2009, and started working freelance as a cameraman and editor. Eight months after the earthquake and tsunami, Paul began a documentary project in Ishinomaki seeking to make something inspiring out of something tragic. The result was a short documentary, Then and Now, which continues to find success in assisting the people of Ishinomaki by bringing awareness to their plight. This success left Paul and his team – Jeffrey and Ivan – with a hunger to do more which led to them collaborating again for the Women of Fukushima.

Women of Fukushima-English subtitles from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.



Greenpeace Feb 2013The disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 proves again that industry profits and people pay. Almost two years after the release of massive amounts of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear disaster, hundreds of thousands of people are still exposed to the long-term radioactive contamination caused by the accident. The daily lives of victims are disrupted. They have lost their homes, their jobs, their businesses, their farms, their communities, and a way of life they enjoyed.

This new Greenpeace report demonstrates how the nuclear sector evades responsibility for its failures. The nuclear industry is unlike any other industry: it is not required to fully compensate its victims for the effects of its large, long-lasting, and trans-boundary disasters. In this report, the current status of compensation for victims of the Fukushima disaster is analysed as an example of the serious problems due to lack of accountability for nuclear accidents. The report also looks into the role of nuclear suppliers in the failure of the Fukushima reactors.

We learned from Fukushima that nuclear power can never be safe. The nuclear industry, largely protected from the financial liability for the Fukushima accident, continues to do business, while the Fukushima victims still lack proper compensation and support. Would things be different if the next big nuclear disaster happened in your country? You would likely be facing the very same problems. We have to phase out dangerous nuclear power entirely, and do so as soon as possible. Yet, if there is another major nuclear accident, people could be given better protection if we hold the nuclear industry fully accountable and liable. We need to learn the lessons from Fukushima, and change the system in order to make all companies in the nuclear industry responsible for the risks they create. (Source and Text – Greenpeace.com)



 Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown, children in Fukushima are suffering from severe nose bleeds and are developing skin rashes and thyroid cysts and nodules (A2). Citing a lack of transparency in the official medical testing of their children and the ineffectiveness of the decontamination of their homes and schools, the children’s mothers take radiation monitoring into their own hands.

 

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland. At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”. Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian Thomas Ash – Awards :

Nippon Visions Award (best film by new-coming Japan-based director)
at the 2013 Nippon Connection Japanese Film Festival in Frankfurt, Germany, for ‘A2-B-C’ (2013, Japan)

Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary
at the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival for “In the Grey Zone” (2012, Japan).

Filmmaker of the Future Award
at the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival.

Prix de Canton Vaud (best first film)
at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland, for “the ballad of vicki and jake” (2006, UK).



On 15-17 December 2012, the Japanese Government hosted the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety which was co-sponsored by the IAEA. During the conference, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano and the Governor of Fukushima Prefecture, Yuhei Sato, signed a Memorandum of Cooperation which encompasses three projects related to Radiation Monitoring and Decontamination; Human Health; and Emergency Preparedness and Response (EPR).
With respect to the latter, the project will involve the designation of an “IAEA Response and Assistance Network (RANET) Capacity Building Centre”, located in the Fukushima Prefecture, which will conduct training activities in the field of EPR for local, national and international participants. Currently, at least one course for local/national participants and two courses for international participants are envisaged annually over the next five years. The Capacity Building Centre will also store radiological monitoring equipment, which will be used in the training activities and can also be deployed by the IAEA in the case of nuclear or radiological emergencies in the Asia Pacific region, should such an emergency arise despite all efforts to prevent one.
The statement made by Director General Yukiya Amano during the opening of the conference is also available online. Additional material from the conference, including the Chairperson Summaries from the three Working Sessions, is available online. On 19 December. TEPCO provided a document with results from a radionuclide analysis of air at the openings of various buildings onsite.

Tepco – IAEA Visiting Fukushima Daiichi NPS – (Seismic isolated building,Inside of the Bus,Unit4 R/B operating floor) – (2:19)

 

 



In Containment: the people of Minamisoma, 15 months after the meltdown
「格納容器の中」南相馬市民、メルトダウンから15ヶ月後
Part 5 STORY: After returning from the exclusion zone, the crew goes to a testing site to be measured for radiation exposure. Later, Ian visits a nursery school located just outside of the 30km radiation zone, where the head teacher opens up about her fears for the children’s future. Finally, the children go out to play, but their conversation quickly turns shockingly real.

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland.

At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”.

Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian’s Filmography:

“minus1287”, director/ producer. documentary/ 61 min/ Japan/ est 2014.
As she nears the end of life, Kazuko’s observations on love, money, marriage and her own death change, as does her relationship with the filmmaker.

“A2-B-C”, director. documentary/ 71 min/ Japan/ 2013.
Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, children who were not evacuated are found to have thyroid cysts and nodules.

“In the Grey Zone”, director.  documentary/ 89 min/ Japan/ 2012.
The children of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, living inside the radiation zone head back to school after the nuclear meltdown.

“Jake, not finished yet”, director.  documentary/ 81 min/ Japan & UK/ 2010.
The story of two mothers and two sons whose chance meeting seven years earlier changes their lives forever.

“the ballad of vicki and jake”, director/ producer.  documentary/ 84 min/ UK/ 2006.
A family struggles with drug abuse, homelessness and their relationship with the filmmaker.


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