Six Japanese women offer brutally honest views on the state of the clean-up, the cover-ups and untruths since the nuclear accident in Fukushima, and how it has affected their lives, homes and families.

Over a year since three reactors went into meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, a broad, disparate anti-nuclear movement is growing in Japan. Nowhere is that more apparent, perhaps, than in Fukushima prefecture, where a group of local women boldly protest the deafening silence of the Japanese government over the worst nuclear accident of this century. Largely ignored by their own media, these brave women brush aside their cultural shyness and share their brutally honest views on the state of the cleanup, the cover-ups, the untruths and the stagnant political climate in today’s Japan. Supported with rare footage from inside the exclusion zone, as well as from abandoned neighboring towns, the Women of Fukushima (“Fukushima no Onnatachi”) offers startlingly candid insights, in the women’s own voices, about what has become of their lives, homes, and families in the aftermath of 3/11. women-of-fukushima.com

Women of Fukushima-English subtitles from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.

Paul Johannessen, Director / Producer:
Born in Sydney, Australia, Paul has worked in both TV/Film production and music production since 1999. After a brief period in Norway, Paul moved to Tokyo in 2009, and started working freelance as a cameraman and editor. Eight months after the earthquake and tsunami, Paul began a documentary project in Ishinomaki seeking to make something inspiring out of something tragic. The result was a short documentary, Then and Now, which continues to find success in assisting the people of Ishinomaki by bringing awareness to their plight. This success left Paul and his team – Jeffrey and Ivan – with a hunger to do more which led to them collaborating again for the Women of Fukushima.

Women of Fukushima-English subtitles from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo.



Then and Now : During a trip to Ishinomaki in November 2011, and after the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster ; Paul, Ivan and Jeffrey interviewed a number of the Tsunami survivors.Eight months, to the day, after the disaster of March 11, 2011, they visited the reconstruction area in Ishinomaki, interviewed many survivors rebuilding their lives and recorded the condition of the Kadonowaki tsunami area. They captured their tragic memories, sadness, anger, hope, insurmountable frustration, their seemingly unstoppable power, their humanity and their relentless desire to build their future. The Team condensed this day into a 15 minute film and posted it on Vimeo and Youtube. It has been viewed by 350,000 people. As a direct result, over 20,000 US dollars in funds and supplies have been delivered to Tohoku.


Born in Sydney, Australia, Paul Richard Johannessen has worked in both TV/Film production and music production since 1999. After a brief period in Norway, Paul moved to Tokyo in 2009, and started working freelance as a cameraman and editor.

Jeffrey Jousan, Born in Tenafly, New Jersey, is a audiophile recordist/engineer, producer, location coordinator and interviewer. Passionate about high quality sound, on location, on set or in the studio, he knows the power of sound adds emotion and life to video. In addition to great sound and stunning images, the subjects of interviews must feel comfortable and trust their interviewer. Jeffrey, quickly puts his interviewees at ease, with jokes, a story or shared experience, a soft tone of voice and focused, compassionate attention which brings a natural frankness and intimacy to the Interviews. Jeffrey has been working with Kugi Productions. The founders are Paul Johannessen, Jeffrey Jousan and Ivan Kovac – three film-makers who were all living in Japan during the disaster in 2011 (Women of Fukushima is the first production produced by « Kugi Productions »). On top of that He’s working for Studio J and other projects.

Eight months after the earthquake and tsunami, Paul began a documentary project in Ishinomaki seeking to make something inspiring out of something tragic. The result was a short documentary, Then and Now, which continues to find success in assisting the people of Ishinomaki by bringing awareness to their plight. « Then and Now » is the proud winner of Best Documentary and the Grand Prix prize at Super Shorts Film Festival, 2012. The video is also available in the following languages:Portuguese: vimeo.com/41279189 Italian: vimeo.com/40420477. This success left, Paul and his team, – Jeffrey and Ivan – with a hunger to do more which led to them collaborating again for the Women of Fukushima.



 Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown, children in Fukushima are suffering from severe nose bleeds and are developing skin rashes and thyroid cysts and nodules (A2). Citing a lack of transparency in the official medical testing of their children and the ineffectiveness of the decontamination of their homes and schools, the children’s mothers take radiation monitoring into their own hands.

 

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland. At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”. Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian Thomas Ash – Awards :

Nippon Visions Award (best film by new-coming Japan-based director)
at the 2013 Nippon Connection Japanese Film Festival in Frankfurt, Germany, for ‘A2-B-C’ (2013, Japan)

Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary
at the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival for “In the Grey Zone” (2012, Japan).

Filmmaker of the Future Award
at the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival.

Prix de Canton Vaud (best first film)
at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland, for “the ballad of vicki and jake” (2006, UK).



In Containment: the people of Minamisoma, 15 months after the meltdown
「格納容器の中」南相馬市民、メルトダウンから15ヶ月後
Part 5 STORY: After returning from the exclusion zone, the crew goes to a testing site to be measured for radiation exposure. Later, Ian visits a nursery school located just outside of the 30km radiation zone, where the head teacher opens up about her fears for the children’s future. Finally, the children go out to play, but their conversation quickly turns shockingly real.

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland.

At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”.

Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian’s Filmography:

“minus1287”, director/ producer. documentary/ 61 min/ Japan/ est 2014.
As she nears the end of life, Kazuko’s observations on love, money, marriage and her own death change, as does her relationship with the filmmaker.

“A2-B-C”, director. documentary/ 71 min/ Japan/ 2013.
Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, children who were not evacuated are found to have thyroid cysts and nodules.

“In the Grey Zone”, director.  documentary/ 89 min/ Japan/ 2012.
The children of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, living inside the radiation zone head back to school after the nuclear meltdown.

“Jake, not finished yet”, director.  documentary/ 81 min/ Japan & UK/ 2010.
The story of two mothers and two sons whose chance meeting seven years earlier changes their lives forever.

“the ballad of vicki and jake”, director/ producer.  documentary/ 84 min/ UK/ 2006.
A family struggles with drug abuse, homelessness and their relationship with the filmmaker.



Safecast : <<We’re incredibly excited to announce the launch of the Safecast iOS app available in the App Store now. Last year we reached out to Nick Dolezal, creator of the most amazing GeigerBot, with some questions and ideas about his app. It didn’t take long for us to realize he would be a fantastic addition to the Safecast team and he agreed. We started brainstorming on what a Safecast iOS app might look like and what it might offer. The results of those continued discussions are live now. We’re most excited about the “virtual geiger counter” aspect to this app – using the GPS on your iPhone or iPad you can quickly see readings that have been taken around you. We’ve got the full Safecast dataset on board, as well as a handful of other publicly available radiation measurement data sets which gives a comprehensive exposure map for the US and Japan, with other areas being filled in as we collect those readings. There’s also the ability to connect your own geiger counter and take readings which can be submitted back to the Safecast Database.

We feel like this will be an incredibly useful application for just about anyone to have, and hope to keep improving it’s functionality as well grow. Enjoy! >>

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/safecast/id571167450?mt=8

Safecast | Adrian Storey from Focus Forward Films on Vimeo.

 



 *** version Françaises: http://youtu.be/-3dm3bBzoXU *** 「格納容器の中」

Part 4 STORY: Ian and Hiroshi enter the exclusion zone, 10km from the damaged nuclear power plant in Fukushima. After traveling down the tsunami-ravaged coast, they drive through the center of Namie town, which was badly damaged in the earthquake. After getting out of the car to measure radiation levels, they are stopped by a police patrol and questioned. Finally, after coming across a herd of cows that roams freely in the exclusion zone, the film crew unknowingly drives directly into a radiation hotspot.

NOTE: The radiation measurements are in millirem per hour (mR/h). 1 mR/h equals 10 microsieverts per hour (microSv/h). The top reading of 500 mR/h in the film is equal to 5,000 microSv/h.

Born in America, Ian Thomas Ash earned an MA in Film and Television Production at the University of Bristol, UK, in 2005. His first feature documentary, ‘the ballad of vicki and jake’ (84 min/ UK/ 2006), received the Prix du Canton Vaud prize at the 2006 Visions du Reél International Documentary Film Festival in Nyon, Switzerland.

At the 2012 Rhode Island International Film Festival, Ian’s film ‘In the Grey Zone’ (89 min/ Japan/ 2012) won the “Audience Choice Award First Prize for Best Documentary”, and at the same festival Ian was presented with the “Filmmaker of the Future Award”.

Ian’s latest film, ‘A2-B-C’ (71 min/ Japan/ 2013), recently received the “Nippon Visions Award” (best film by new-coming Japan-based director) at the 2013 Nippon Connection Film Festival. Ian has lived in Japan for 10 years and currently lives in Tokyo.

Ian’s Filmography:

“minus1287”, director/ producer. documentary/ 61 min/ Japan/ est 2014.
As she nears the end of life, Kazuko’s observations on love, money, marriage and her own death change, as does her relationship with the filmmaker.

“A2-B-C”, director.

documentary/ 71 min/ Japan/ 2013.
Eighteen months after the nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, children who were not evacuated are found to have thyroid cysts and nodules.

“In the Grey Zone”, director.  documentary/ 89 min/ Japan/ 2012.
The children of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, living inside the radiation zone head back to school after the nuclear meltdown.

“Jake, not finished yet”, director.  documentary/ 81 min/ Japan & UK/ 2010.
The story of two mothers and two sons whose chance meeting seven years earlier changes their lives forever.

“the ballad of vicki and jake”, director/ producer.  documentary/ 84 min/ UK/ 2006.
A family struggles with drug abuse, homelessness and their relationship with the filmmaker.



福島の女たち : 6人の日本人女性が、福島原発事故以降の汚染除去の現状、隠ぺいと嘘について包み隠さぬ本音を打ち明け、そして事故が彼女たちの人生、故郷、家族にどのような影響を及ぼしたかについて語ります。

概要: 福島第一原子力発電所で3基の原子炉がメルトダウンを起こしてから1年以上。さまざまな人々による大がかりな反原発運動が日本国内で拡大しつつあります。 この運動がもっとも顕著なのは、おそらく福島県でしょう。そこでは地元の女性グループが勇敢にも立ち上がり、今世紀最悪の原発事故に対する日本政府の沈黙 に抗議しているのです。国内メディアにほとんど無視されてきたこの勇敢な女性たちは、内気な県民性を脇へ押しやり、現在の日本における汚染除去の現状や隠 ぺい、嘘、そして停滞した政治情勢について包み隠さぬ率直な意見を公表しています。立ち入り禁止区域内や周辺の荒れ果てた無人の村々の貴重な映像と共に、 「福島の女たち」は3・11によって彼女たちの人生、故郷、家族がどのような影響を受けたのかについての驚くほど率直な見解を、彼女たち自身の声で伝えま す。

福島の女たち from Paul Johannessen on Vimeo (Women of Fukushima) : Six Japanese women offer brutally honest views on the state of the clean-up, the cover-ups and untruths since the nuclear accident in Fukushima, and how it has affected their lives, homes and families.

映像制作者の言葉:

 2011年3月11日に福島第一原子力発電所で起こった惨劇の余波の全貌が明らかになるには、何十年もの時間がかかるでしょう。事故直後の劇的な状態から長期的でほとんど目に見えない脅威へと移行した今、福島県民が直面する現状が世界のメディアのアンテナに捉えられなくなってしまうという(あるいは、日本のメディアの場合、存在しないままになってしまうという)本当の危機が迫っています。現在に至るまで、メルトダウンの影響で子どもたちは外で遊ぶことができず、家族は離散し、女性は胎児の遺伝子損傷を恐れて中絶までする事態が続いています。福島では、希望を見出すことが困難なのです。

 しかし、積極的に発言する地元女性グループとの会合後、我々は彼女たちの精神と背景を記録しなければと強く感じました。文化的には内気で物静かなこの日本人女性たちは怒りと不安、不満、そして希望に対する喪失感を力に変え、日本を、そして世界を、子どもたちのためにより安全な場所にするべく立ち上がろうと呼びかける声を上げたのです。日本政府の嘘と無関心に対する彼女たちの回復力と率直さを目の当たりにして、我々は彼女たちが自分の意見を発表できるプラットフォームを提供しようと決断しました。そしてその結果は我々に驚きと衝撃、そして刺激を与えるものです。

 今回の映像を制作した目的は、誰もが沈黙を守る中で遭えて声を上げた女性たちの誠実さと勇気を世界中の人々が目撃できるようにすることです。

Over a year since three reactors went into meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, a broad, disparate anti-nuclear movement is growing in Japan. Nowhere is that more apparent, perhaps, than in Fukushima prefecture, where a group of local women boldly protest the deafening silence of the Japanese government over the worst nuclear accident of this century. Largely ignored by their own media, these brave women brush aside their cultural shyness and share their brutally honest views on the state of the cleanup, the cover-ups, the untruths and the stagnant political climate in today’s Japan. Supported with rare footage from inside the exclusion zone, as well as from abandoned neighboring towns, the Women of Fukushima (“Fukushima no Onnatachi”) offers startlingly candid insights, in the women’s own voices, about what has become of their lives, homes, and families in the aftermath of 3/11.